NARFE NewsLine Advocacy Update - November 12, 2019

November 12, 2019

PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE

Results from the 2019 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey (FEVS) were released late last week, and the data on last winter's partial government shutdown is not surprising. According to OPM, almost one out of every two federal employees either worked without pay or did not work at all. Despite this, an overwhelming majority of federal employees (90 percent) still report having a passion for their work, desire to help others and a sense of value. This comes as no surprise to me, as every day I encounter dedicated workers who feel a sense of duty to their country. I thank them for continuing this dedication through times of turmoil.

 

ADVOCACY UPDATE

Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey Measures Impact of Shutdown, Employee Satisfaction

The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) released its annual Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey (FEVS), which measures the perspectives of federal employees across job types, agencies and locations for continuous improvement in the federal workforce. The FEVS was distributed as a census to all permanent and nonseasonal federal employees; nearly 43 percent responded.

Survey questions were broken into 10 broad topic areas and included questions about the impact of the 35-day partial government shutdown, the longest in history. According to the survey, 46 percent of respondents indicated they were either forced to work without pay or furloughed, and that their pay was delayed until after the lapse. Of those reporting that the shutdown negatively impacted their work, 67 percent experienced delayed work, and 32 percent reported reduced work quality. Nearly half—48 and 46 percent—respectively, reported diminished customer service and missed deadlines due to the lapse. Another 25 percent had to cut back on critical work, and 21 percent lost work forever. Ten percent of respondents indicated they were looking for new jobs because of, or partially due to, the government shutdown.
 
The survey also highlighted the diligent nature of the federal workforce and their desire to fulfill their agencies’ missions. Here are some key takeaways: 96 percent of respondents reported they are willing to put in extra effort to get a job done, 91 percent agree they are constantly looking for ways to improve their performance, 90 percent believe their work is important, and 84 percent believe the work they perform is high quality. Meanwhile, some survey answers regarding managers’ ability to deal with performance and rewards could be used to push for civil service modernization proposals, such as pay-for-performance and increased employee accountability. For example, among nonsupervisory employee respondents, only 34 percent believe that steps are taken to deal with poor performers, and 56 percent report that poor performers remain in the unit and continue poor work. Only 28 percent believe that pay raises depend on job performance, and only 39 percent believe that promotions are based on merit.
 
Overall employee engagement for 2019 scored 68 percent, the same as last year. These measures are based on employees’ perceptions of leadership, supervisors, and feelings of motivation and competency in the workplace. Some key performance drivers mirrored the overall score, with 68 percent of respondents, on average, indicating that discussions with supervisors about performance are worthwhile, productive and provide an opportunity to improve.  

Global satisfaction, which assesses job, pay and organizational employee satisfaction—as well as whether employees would recommend their agencies as good places to work—increased by one point, to 65 percent. Most large agencies, which employ between 10,000 and 75,000 people, only experienced minor changes in satisfaction. However, small agencies, which employ fewer than 1,000 people, saw some dramatic shifts, such as an 11 percent increase in satisfaction at the Selective Service System and a 20 percent decrease at the Corporation for National and Community Service.

National Active and Retired

FEDERAL EMPLOYEES Association

NARFE (National Active and Retired Federal Employees Association) 606 N. Washington St., Alexandria, VA 22314, Phone: (703) 838-7760, Fax: (703) 838-7785.

 

This is the only website that reflects the official opinions and positions of the National Active and Retired Federal Employees Association (NARFE). Opinions and/or positions that appear on any other site bearing NARFE's name or seal are not necessarily those of NARFE. Click here for Privacy Statement.   NARFE has been certified by Dun & Bradstreet.

NARFE NewsLine Advocacy Update - November 12, 2019

November 12, 2019

PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE

Results from the 2019 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey (FEVS) were released late last week, and the data on last winter's partial government shutdown is not surprising. According to OPM, almost one out of every two federal employees either worked without pay or did not work at all. Despite this, an overwhelming majority of federal employees (90 percent) still report having a passion for their work, desire to help others and a sense of value. This comes as no surprise to me, as every day I encounter dedicated workers who feel a sense of duty to their country. I thank them for continuing this dedication through times of turmoil.

 

ADVOCACY UPDATE

Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey Measures Impact of Shutdown, Employee Satisfaction

The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) released its annual Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey (FEVS), which measures the perspectives of federal employees across job types, agencies and locations for continuous improvement in the federal workforce. The FEVS was distributed as a census to all permanent and nonseasonal federal employees; nearly 43 percent responded.

Survey questions were broken into 10 broad topic areas and included questions about the impact of the 35-day partial government shutdown, the longest in history. According to the survey, 46 percent of respondents indicated they were either forced to work without pay or furloughed, and that their pay was delayed until after the lapse. Of those reporting that the shutdown negatively impacted their work, 67 percent experienced delayed work, and 32 percent reported reduced work quality. Nearly half—48 and 46 percent—respectively, reported diminished customer service and missed deadlines due to the lapse. Another 25 percent had to cut back on critical work, and 21 percent lost work forever. Ten percent of respondents indicated they were looking for new jobs because of, or partially due to, the government shutdown.
 
The survey also highlighted the diligent nature of the federal workforce and their desire to fulfill their agencies’ missions. Here are some key takeaways: 96 percent of respondents reported they are willing to put in extra effort to get a job done, 91 percent agree they are constantly looking for ways to improve their performance, 90 percent believe their work is important, and 84 percent believe the work they perform is high quality. Meanwhile, some survey answers regarding managers’ ability to deal with performance and rewards could be used to push for civil service modernization proposals, such as pay-for-performance and increased employee accountability. For example, among nonsupervisory employee respondents, only 34 percent believe that steps are taken to deal with poor performers, and 56 percent report that poor performers remain in the unit and continue poor work. Only 28 percent believe that pay raises depend on job performance, and only 39 percent believe that promotions are based on merit.
 
Overall employee engagement for 2019 scored 68 percent, the same as last year. These measures are based on employees’ perceptions of leadership, supervisors, and feelings of motivation and competency in the workplace. Some key performance drivers mirrored the overall score, with 68 percent of respondents, on average, indicating that discussions with supervisors about performance are worthwhile, productive and provide an opportunity to improve.  

Global satisfaction, which assesses job, pay and organizational employee satisfaction—as well as whether employees would recommend their agencies as good places to work—increased by one point, to 65 percent. Most large agencies, which employ between 10,000 and 75,000 people, only experienced minor changes in satisfaction. However, small agencies, which employ fewer than 1,000 people, saw some dramatic shifts, such as an 11 percent increase in satisfaction at the Selective Service System and a 20 percent decrease at the Corporation for National and Community Service.



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NARFE (National Active and Retired Federal Employees Association) 606 N. Washington St., Alexandria, VA 22314, Phone: (703) 838-7760, Fax: (703) 838-7785.

 

This is the only website that reflects the official opinions and positions of the National Active and Retired Federal Employees Association (NARFE). Opinions and/or positions that appear on any other site bearing NARFE's name or seal are not necessarily those of NARFE. Click here for Privacy Statement.   NARFE has been certified by Dun & Bradstreet.